'86 Rabbit

A FANGirl's Forkstress of Solitude

The New Moon Trailer

 

I went to see The Proposal with OMB and a bunch of friends. I’m so glad the girls were with me! None of us knew the New Moon trailer was playing before the movie! Talk about involuntary SQUEE! All we needed to see was the water and the rocks. There was a collective gasp at shirtless Jacob the likes of which I haven’t heard since we first saw Cedric Diggory jump out of that tree in Goblet of Fire. The theater was packed, and just about everyone seemed excited. Even one of the guys with us said, “Whoa! What happened to him?” I kept reminding the girls, “He’s only 17. He’s only 17…” I mean clearly I didn’t need reminding, being firmly on Team Edward. Don’t worry. I let everyone know that if they didn’t calm down that Chris Hansen would be showing up. That being said, can I just say how hilarious I think it is that you hear Laurent say, “mouthwatering,” and then the next thing you see is shirtless Jacob. What a clever subliminal message. I’m just sayin’!

The preview looked even better on the big screen, especially the fur-sploding wolf. I do hope that Edward doesn’t stop at, “This is the last time you will ever see me,” and actually does say, “It will be as if I never existed,” like he’s supposed to.  But all in all New Moon looks like it may be good, definitely better than Twilight.

We were all ready to go after the preview, but were pleasantly surprised that for the price of $9.50 they were actually going to let us see a movie, too. The Proposal was a lot of fun. We expected it to be good, but it was a lot funnier than any of us expected. It’s one of those movies that when I’m flipping through the channels I know I will have to stop and watch.

June 20, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Host

You asked for it, ArtisticPhilosopher, and you got it. Here’s my blog entry about The Host, by Stephenie Meyer. I figure I can blog about other SMeyer works on my All-Twi-All-The-Time blog. My blog, my rules, and I say it’s close enough.

(courtesy of StephenieMeyer.com)

(courtesy of StephenieMeyer.com)

It had been nearly a year since I read The Host, so I reread it. What the heck. It’s not like I have the money for new books at the mo’. By the way, this is the only non-series book I ever gave a second read. I’ve read Harry Potter and Twilight four times each.

Let’s start with the cover. Read on if you don’t mind a few spoilers…

Continue reading

June 11, 2009 Posted by | Essays, Stephenie Meyer | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Feminist Male College Graduate: Chapter 4

Chapter 4, Invitations, is next up on Benjamin Wheeler’s blog. It was a short post, but I think I might have quite a bit to say. We’ll see. Don’t forget to read Benjamin’s blog. It’ll make much more sense in context.

Continue reading

May 3, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

It’s Just A Book

Mom has never understood my Fangirl, nor my FANGirl, ways. Star Wars is, “just a story.” Anne Rice’s vampires, “are not real.” Twilight is, “just a book.” I never understood why she didn’t get excited about the books she read. Well, she gets excited, but there isn’t the fervor, the obsession, that I experience when I really get into a ‘verse. She just lets the book or movie wash over her. There is nothing more to it. I had hope for her when she read Harry Potter. She read it before I did, and I loved listening to her frequent tidbits about how imaginative it is. When I finally read it I thought we’d have great Potter talks. Not so. She didn’t remember a lot of it, and now that she wasn’t in the middle of reading it, it was, “just a book.” This is the difference between an avid reader and a fangirl, I suppose.

Ok, so that’s the back story. Today, I told Mom what a delightful time I had talking to Peanut the other day, and that we talked a lot about Twilight. I told her about Peanut being interested in certain labs and lectures at schools because of the Twilight connection, and about my epiphany that this is what any sort of fandom does for people. She agreed and said her genealogy work had sparked an interest in Irish history. Previously she was never a fan of history. Then the inevitable came: “But Edward’s not real.” She continued with her usual diatribe that he’s just a character, it’s just a story, and there isn’t anything more to it than what’s on the page. When I was Peanut’s age, I was all about Star Wars. I wondered about the stuff fangirls wonder about. If I had known then what I know now, I would have written fanfic and probably would have written several Star Wars novels in the expanded universe by now. Mom told me I couldn’t write in someone else’s ‘verse, essentially, that I had to write my own stuff.

So, what do you say when someone says, “He’s not real,” about our beloved Edward (or Jacob, if you swing that way)? You sound as crazy as they already know you are if you just say, “Wait…Wh-what do you…I don’t…Ya-huh!” Well, I had another epiphany today, and I think I stumped Mom. I said, “You know, if it weren’t for fans, there wouldn’t be any classics, no one to debate the merits of Jane Austen, no one to discuss symbolism and subtext.”

What do you think? Is this why we have classics? Is it because a group of people loved a story so much that a collective discussion started and just never ended? It can’t all be critical acclaim and academia. Books have to sell, too. That means fans are a necessity in the making of a classic, I would think.

April 15, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments